Frequently
asked
questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Is it lawful to possess low-THC oil in Georgia?

A: Georgia law (O.C.G.A. §16-12-191) states three components must be present for lawful possession of low-THC oil:

  1. the total amount of low-THC oil is 20 fluid ounces (or less);

  2. the person is registered with, and has in his or her possession a registration card issued by, the Georgia Department of Public Health; and

  3. the low-THC oil is in a pharmaceutical container labeled as such by the manufacturer indicating the percentage of tetrahydrocannabinol therein.

Q: How can I obtain a Low-THC Oil Registry card in Georgia?

A: Patients register with the Georgia Department of Public Health after consulting with a doctor or physician.
Visit the Georgia Department of Public Health website for more information.

Q: Where can I purchase Low-THC Oil in Georgia?

A: The Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission does not prescribe or dispense low THC oil. The Commission is charged with licensing and regulating Production Facilities and Dispensaries. Medical cannabis oil is not available for purchase yet in Georgia, but will be available for purchase after the Commission issues Dispensing Licenses.

Q: Who is eligible for the Low THC Oil Registry Card in Georgia?

A: There are three categories of persons who may apply for the card after consulting with a doctor or physician:

  1. an adult who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law;

  2. legal guardians of an adult who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law; or

  3. parents or legal guardians of a minor child who has one or more of the diseases specified in the law.

Visit the Georgia Department of Public Health website for more information.

Q: What conditions or diseases are covered by the law?

A: The law lists the following conditions and diseases which qualify for the Low THC Oil Registry:

  • Cancer, when such diagnosis is end stage or the treatment produces related wasting illness or recalcitrant nausea and vomiting

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, when such diagnosis is severe or end stage

  • Seizure disorders related to diagnosis of epilepsy or trauma related head injuries

  • Multiple sclerosis, when such diagnosis is severe or end stage

  • Crohn’s disease

  • Mitochondrial disease

  • Parkinson’s disease, when such diagnosis is sever or end stage

  • Sickle cell disease, when such diagnosis is severe or end stage

  • Tourette’s syndrome, when such syndrome is diagnosed as severe

  • Autism spectrum disorder, when (a) patient is 18 years of age or more, or (b) patient is less than 18 years of age and diagnosed with severe autism

  • Epidermolysis bullosa

  • Alzheimer’s disease, when such disease is severe or end stage

  • AIDS when such syndrome is severe or end stage

  • Peripheral neuropathy, when symptoms are severe or end stage

  • Patient is in hospice program, either as inpatient or outpatient

  • Intractable pain

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder resulting from direct exposure to or witnessing of a trauma for a patient who is at least 18 years of age

Visit the Georgia Department of Public Health website for more information.

Q: How does Georgia’s medical cannabis law compare to laws in other states?

A: Georgia’s law is much more limited than some other states. For example, it does not legalize the growing, sale, or possession of marijuana in plant or leaf form. It does not authorize the production, sale, or ingestion of food products infused with low THC oil, or the inhalation of low THC oil through smoking, electronic vaping, or vapor. It does not authorize physicians to prescribe marijuana for medical use. It is intended solely to protect persons with an active Low-THC Oil Registry Card from criminal prosecution for possessing less than 20 ounces of low THC oil for medicinal purposes.

Q: Will Georgia recognize my registration from another state?

A: It depends, only if you lawfully possess a valid registration card issued by another state that allows the same possession of low THC oil as Georgia law and you have been in Georgia less than 45 days. Cannabis programs are state-based, and vary from state to state; there is no 'reciprocity' between Georgia and other states for medical cannabis.

Visit the Georgia Department of Public Health website for more information.

Q: What is the difference between "medical cannabis" and "medical marijuana"?

A: The botanical terms can mean the same thing. The legal terms are different. In most states "medical marijuana" is a legal term that refers to state registration programs for patients to grow, possess, and smoke marijuana; in legal terms Georgia is not a "medical marijuana" state. Growing, possessing, and smoking marijuana are criminal offenses in Georgia punishable by fines and imprisonment. Georgia is a "medical cannabis" low-THC oil patient registry state, which means there is a lawful pathway for patients registered with the Georgia Department of Public Health, after certifying with a doctor or physician, to purchase and possess 20 ounces or less of low-THC oil.

Q: Is marijuana now legal in Georgia? Where can I buy it?

A: No. The law does not make the sale or possession of all types of marijuana legal in Georgia. Possession of any form of marijuana by an unauthorized person is, and remains, a violation of state and federal law. Georgia law only authorizes the legal possession of up to 20 fluid ounces of low THC oil by registered patients with a valid Low-THC Oil Registry Card.

Q: Can I now sell medical marijuana in Georgia?

A: No. It is, and remains, a violation of state and federal law for unauthorized businesses or persons to sell any form of marijuana. Businesses licensed by the Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission may grow medical cannabis for the purpose of manufacturing low THC oil in Georgia. Only Dispensaries licensed by the Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission or the Georgia Board of Pharmacy may sell low-THC oil in Georgia.


Q: Who licenses Hemp growing in Georgia?

A: The Georgia Department of Agriculture regulates licensing for industrial hemp in Georgia.
For more information, visit the Georgia Department of Agriculture website here.